The Truth2018-11-01T08:56:45+00:00

The Truth Is In The Statistics

Empowerment means knowledge. Data shows that violence, harassment, and bullying have a huge impact on girls and young women. Only when you see the problem can you begin to find the answers.

THE TRUTH – VIOLENCE AND YOUNG PEOPLE

Nearly 1 in 9 female teens reported experiencing physical dating violence in the last year

Learn More Facts Below

THE TRUTH – SCHOOL VIOLENCE

6%

In 2015-16, about 6% of students in grades 9–12 reported that they had been threatened or injured with a weapon on school property during the previous 12 months

Learn More About School Violence Below

THE TRUTH – SEXUAL VIOLENCE

19%

19% of women in the U.S. have been raped during their lifetimes

Learn More About Sexual Violence Below

THE TRUTH – STALKING

1 in 4 stalking victims report some form of cyberstalking

Learn More About Stalking Below

THE TRUTH – BULLYING

More than 2.7 Million

In 2015-16, more than 2.7 million (23%) of female students ages 12–18 reported being bullied at school during the school year

Learn More About Bullying Below

THE TRUTH – SEXUAL HARRASSMENT

57%

57% of women who experience sexual harassment or assault suffer their first experience before age 17

Learn More About Sexual Harassment Below

THE TRUTH – MANIPULATION

Manipulation is often difficult to see.

Especially if you do not know what to look for. It does not leave physical marks or scars.

Learn More About Manipulation Below

THE TRUTH – VIOLENCE AND YOUNG PEOPLE

Young people are victims of violence far too often. In fact, young women in particular face a greater risk of dating violence.

57.7%

57.7% of children age 1 month to 17 years have been exposed to violence in the past year1

44%

Only 44% of all violent victimizations against females are reported to police2

Nearly 1 in 9 female teens reported experiencing physical dating violence in the last year3

Nearly 1 in 9 female teens reported experiencing sexual dating violence in the last year3

Definition: Dating violence is a pattern of abusive behaviors – including emotional, physical, sexual, and financial abuse – used to exert power and control over a dating partner.

Sources:

  1. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, Centers for Disease Control, National Survey of Children’s Exposure to Violence, 2015
  2. Bureau of Justice Statistics, National Crime Victimization Survey, 2016
  3. National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control, Preventing Teen Dating Violence, 2017

THE TRUTH – SCHOOL VIOLENCE

The threat of school violence has a crippling effect. On students, parents, teachers, and more. It leaves lasting physical and behavioral effects on victims, and of course can lead to severe harm and death.

6%

In 2015-16, about 6% of students in grades 9–12 reported that they had been threatened or injured with a weapon on school property during the previous 12 months1

5%

In 2015, about 5% of students ages 12-18 reported that they avoided at least one school activity or class, or one or more places in school, during the previous school year because they thought someone might attack or harm them1

262%

In postsecondary schools, the number of forcible sex crimes on campus increased 262% between 2001 and 20151

Sources:

  1. Bureau of Justice Statistics, National Center for Education Statistics, Indicators of School Crime and Safety: 2017, March 2018

THE TRUTH – SEXUAL VIOLENCE

Sexual violence is a real and present risk for young women.

19%

19% of women in the U.S. have been raped during their lifetimes1

79%

79% of these victims were first raped before age 251

44%

44% of women experience other forms of sexual violence1

16.9%

16.9% of female college freshmen reported sexual contact by physical force or incapacitation2

12.8%

12.8% of female college undergraduates report being victim of intimate partner violence2

31.6%

31.6% of female college undergraduates with a disability reported sexual contact by physical force or incapacitation2

Definition: Sexual violence is a broad term that refers to crimes like sexual assault, rape, and sexual abuse.

Risk Factor: Students who are new to college campuses may experience higher risk because they are not as familiar with situations that may lead to incidents of sexual assault or misconduct2

Sources:

  1. Division of Violence Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control, National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey, 2011
  2. The Association of American Universities, Report on the AAU Campus Climate Survey on Sexual Assault and Sexual Misconduct, 2017

THE TRUTH – STALKING

Young people – and young women in particular – are often victims of stalking. This impacts their lives in a big way. It can lead to fear, anxiety, isolation and more.

Young people between the ages of 18-24 are the most common victims of stalking1

15% of women have been victims of stalking2

54%

54% were first stalked before age 252

61%

61% were stalked by a current or former intimate partner2

25%

25% were stalked by an acquaintance2

1 in 4 stalking victims report some form of cyberstalking1

83% email1 | 35% instant messaging1

46%

46% of stalking victims fear of not knowing what will happen next1

8.9%

8.9% of people ages 18-24 have been victims of stalking or harrassment1

Less than 1/3

Less than 1/3 of states classify stalking as a felony upon first offense3

Definition: Stalking is a pattern of behavior that makes you feel afraid, nervous, harassed, or in danger.

Don’t be a bystander!

Find out what steps to take from the National Center for Victims of Crime.

Sources:

  1. Bureau of Justice Statistics, Stalking Victims in the United States – Revised, 2012
  2. Division of Violence Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control, National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey, 2011
  3. National Center for Victims of Crime, Stalking Resource Center, Stalking Fact Sheet, 2015

THE TRUTH – BULLYING

One of the most pervasive threats girls and young women face is bullying. It is linked to negative health impacts, lower academic performance, and more.

23%

In 2015-16, more than 2.7 million (23%) of female students ages 12–18 reported being bullied at school during the school year1

19%

19% of kids who report being bullied at school say the bullying has somewhat or a lot of negative effect on how they feel about themselves1

14%

In 2015-16, 14% of 15-year-old students attended schools that reported that student learning was hindered, to some extent or a lot, by students intimidating or bullying other students1

12%

In 2015-16, 12% of public schools reported that bullying occurred among students at least once per week1

Types of schools where bullying is most likely to occur: 1

Middle School

21.8% of public middle schools report student bullying that occurs at least once per week, much higher than primary and high schools.

Large Enrollment

22.1% of public schools with more than 1,000+ students report bullying, higher than schools with smaller enrollment sizes.

Small Towns

More public schools in small towns (18.3%) report bullying versus those in city, suburban, and rural locations.

Less Diverse

Public schools with fewer than 5% of minority students report more bullying than schools with more diverse student populations.

Places in schools where bullying occurs: 1

41.7% Hallway/Stairwell

41.7%

33.6% Inside Classroom

33.6%

22.2% Cafeteria

22.2%

19.3% Outside on School Grounds

19.3%

11.5% Online/Text

11.5%

10% On School Bus

10%

9.4% Bathroom/Locker Room

9.4%

Peers Have the Power

57% of bullying situations STOP

when a peer intervenes on behalf of the student being bullied2

Sources:

  1. Bureau of Justice Statistics, National Center for Education Statistics, Indicators of School Crime and Safety: 2017, March 2018
  2. Hawkins, Pepler & Craig, Naturalistic Observations of Peer Interventions in Bullying, 2001

THE TRUTH – SEXUAL HARRASSMENT

A large number of girls and young women face sexual harassment. This cuts across age groups and sexual orientation. A majority of these incidents are not reported.

57% of women who experience sexual harassment or assault suffer their first experience before age 171

Age of females at first sexual harassment or assault incident: 1

4% 0-5 years

4%

10% 6-10 years

10%

16% 11-13 years

16%

27% 14-17 years

27%

15% 18-22 years

15%

A majority of women age 18-24 are victims of one or more forms of sexual harassment. 1

74% Verbal Sexual Harassment

74%

50% Physically Aggressive Sexual Harassment

50%

49% Cyber Sexual Harassment

49%

24% Sexual Assault

24%

Age of females at first sexual harassment or assault incident: 1

4% 0-5 years

4%

10% 6-10 years

10%

16% 11-13 years

16%

27% 14-17 years

27%

15% 18-22 years

15%

A majority of women age 18-24 are victims of one or more forms of sexual harassment. 1

74% Verbal Sexual Harassment

74%

50% Physically Aggressive Sexual Harassment

50%

49% Cyber Sexual Harassment

49%

24% Sexual Assault

24%
48%

48% of lesbian or bisexual women report experiencing sexual assault1

61.9%

61.9% of female college undergraduates report being sexually harassed2

56%

56% of girls in grades 7-12 report experiencing some form of sexual harassment3

12%

Only 12% of girls in grades 7-12 reported sexual harassment incidents to a teacher, guidance counselor, or other adult at school3

Negative effects of sexual harassment on students includes: 3

Trouble Sleeping  |  Felt Sick to Stomach |  Got in Trouble at School |  Changed the Way To or From School |  Stopped Doing an Activity or Sport |  Did Not Want to Go to School

Harassment is a Vicious Cycle
92% of students who admit to sexually harassing another student were also the target of sexual harassment themselves3

Definition: Sexual harassment includes unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical harassment of a sexual nature in the workplace or learning environment4

Sources:

  1. Stop Street Harassment, Raliance, University of California San Diego’s Center on Gender Equity and Health, A National Study on Sexual Harassment and Assault, 2018
  2. The Association of American Universities, Report on the AAU Campus Climate Survey on Sexual Assault and Sexual Misconduct, 2017
  3. American Association of University Women, Crossing the Line: Sexual Harassment at School, 2011
  4. U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission

THE TRUTH – MANIPULATION

Manipulation is often difficult to see. Especially if you do not know what to look for. It does not leave physical marks or scars. Yet it often occurs prior to behavior that does leave physical marks or scars. Or much worse.

Use these links to find ton of information about manipulation. Questions, answers, warning signs, solutions, and more.

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